Novel about Life in the Quabbin Towns

Novel about Life in the Quabbin Towns

Join us on Friday, December 3, at noon. For our last History Bite lecture of the season, Ms Jacqueline T Lynch will talk about Beside the Still Waters; her novel of life in the four Massachusetts towns submerged by the flooding of the Quabbin Reservoir in the 1930s. Families are torn apart, divided between those who protest the construction, those who give up and leave while they can, and those who help to build the dam that will flood the towns. The story is about family, tradition and community, and how our hometowns make up a big part of our family heritage and our personal identities. Photos and map images will accompany the talk.

The Amherst Historical Society’s Fall 2021 History Bites series is being given over Zoom, with technical support from our friends at Amherst Media.

Stories of Amherst

Stories of Amherst

by George Naughton

There can never be one History of Amherst, since there are always more stories to collect and pass on. This week’s presentation is titled ‘Stories of Amherst,’ and will take us on a tour of some of the personalities and events which shaped our town. Did you know that Amherst was founded in the same year, 1759, that the Guinness Brewery was founded in Dublin? We include stories of Amherst’s industrial past, and the connections between Amherst and Japan.

George Naughton is President of the Amherst Historical Society and is a long-time resident of Amherst

(VIDEO IN PROCESS)

Biography of Edward Hitchcock

Biography of Edward Hitchcock

by Robert McMaster

Edward Hitchcock was one of the most eminent American scientists of his time, a popular professor and president at Amherst College, and an inspired preacher. But, nearly 160 years after his death, his story has never really been told. So in his new book, All the Light Here Comes from Above: The Life and Legacy of Edward Hitchcock, Williamsburg author Robert T. McMaster at last brings to light the many facets of one of this state’s and the nation’s most famous sons.

(video in process)

An 18th century rosehead nail from the Simeon Strong House, next to its modern counterpart. As explained by Steve DeWolf, carpenter who specializes in repairing Pioneer Valley historic homes, this nail would have been forged by hand, the head created by striking the metal bar when it was hot. It was pulled from the side of the Strong House during restoration work underway.