An 18th century rosehead nail from the Simeon Strong House, next to its modern counterpart. As explained by Steve DeWolf, carpenter who specializes in repairing Pioneer Valley historic homes, this nail would have been forged by hand, the head created by striking the metal bar when it was hot. It was pulled from the side of the Strong House during restoration work underway.

This 19th century wrapper is only surviving dress known to have been worn by Emily Dickinson. After her death, it was passed on to a cousin and later came to the collection of the Amherst Historical Society. Its design is typical for a house dress of the 1870s-1880s; it is almost entirely machine sewn, and was made sturdy to weather frequent washings.

This miniature straw hat (c. December 17th, 1907) was created by the Hills Hat Factory in Amherst, MA, as a show piece for display to prospective customers. It is marked with the initials of Fannie Marilla (Davis) Pierce.

If you lived in what would become Amherst in the 18th century, this conch shell would have called you to the meetinghouse to worship. “Blowing the kunk,” as it was known, was an appointed job in the community, and the man responsible for blowing this junk also swept out the meetinghouse and received for his troubles $3 a year.