If you lived in what would become Amherst in the 18th century, this conch shell would have called you to the meetinghouse to worship. “Blowing the kunk,” as it was known, was an appointed job in the community, and the man responsible for blowing this kunk also swept out the meetinghouse and received for his troubles $3 a year.

This 19th century paint set belonged to Mabel Loomis Todd, the woman responsible for editing and publishing the work of Emily Dickinson, as well as an artist and author in her own right. Todd authored books and articles, and travelled around the US on a professional lecture tour giving lectures on a wide range of topics, including Emily Dickinson, New England history, and astronomy. A prolific artist and writer, Todd continued creating and traveling until just shortly before her death. Mabel died in 1932 while camping in Maine..

Doll’s teaset (c. early 18th century, France). This porcelain doll’s teaset belonged to Sarah Dickerman Swift of New Haven, Connecticut. It was donated to the Amherst Historical Society in 1975 by her granddaughter, Helen Mitchell.

This fine linen infant cap is the oldest textile in our collection. The crown and side stripes are constructed of bobbin lace, a type of lace created by braiding and twisting thread held in place with pins set into a lace pillow. Take a look at the fine lacework- at the time, even the clothing of infants and small children often featured beautiful, delicate lacework. A piece of clothing like this would be passed down and reused over multiple generations of children.

This unique late-19th century dress once belonged to Mabel Loomis Todd, and was donated to the Amherst Historical Society by her daughter. Purple velvet and old gold silk, with hand-embroidered pansies, created in 1890. Look at the detail on those flowers! Unfortunately, the dress is now too fragile to be displayed as it would have been worn.